Thursday, June 9, 2011

Johnson Says His Polling Meets CNN Debate Criteria

This just in from the Gary Johnson campaign:

The Johnson 2012 Campaign released evidence today confirming that former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson has met the polling criteria to attend the CNN Republican primary debate scheduled for Monday.
Debate sponsors CNN, WMUR and the Union Leader require one of three polling requirements to be reached for a candidate to be included. The Johnson campaign has discovered that the criteria for “an average of at least 2.00 percent in at least three national polls released in May” was achieved using the approved polls below:
• A CNN Opinion Research Corporation Poll released on May 27 shows Governor Johnson at 2% nationally.
• A Gallup poll from May 26 shows Johnson at 3%.
• A Quinnipiac poll released May 4 shows Johnson's support at 1%.
Together the three approved polls total 6%, which is a 2% average, thereby qualifying Governor Johnson for Monday’s debate.

Upon seeing this information, Ron Nielson, Senior Advisor to Johnson's campaign, released the following statement, “It is our hope that CNN will review the criteria that has excluded two-term Governor Gary Johnson from the New Hampshire debate. Now that this information has come to light, we look forward to receiving an invitation for Governor Johnson to participate.”

A couple of qualifications are in order:

In the CNN poll, Johnson is still at 1 percent when all candidates and possible candidates are included. He rises to 2 percent when participants are asked for their second choice and when Rudy Giuliani and/or Sarah Palin are excluded. (Neither Giuliani nor Palin have announced as candidates.)

Likewise inn the Gallup Poll, Johnson is at 1 percent when Palin is listed, but goes up to two percent when she's excluded.

For more on Johnson and his exclusion from the CNN New Hampshire debate, Rob at Capitol Report New Mexico has share this link to The Atlantic.

1 comment:

  1. The Republican Party is led by dummies who probably think we're not a state, yet.

    ReplyDelete